Cleveland Model Airplane Plans: Primary Product Line

The model airplane plan subjects in the Cleveland Primary Product Line cover five different aviation eras, including (1) Dawn of Flight (pre-1914), (2) World War I (1914 to 1918), (3) Golden Age (1919 to 1938), World War II (1939 to 1945), and, Post World War II (1946 and on). In addition, the subjects in the Cleveland Primary Product Line cover thirteen aircraft types, including (1) Aviation Pioneer, (2) Bomber, (3) Fighter, (4) Observation, (5) Trainer, (6) Airliner/Cargo, (7) Light Commercial, (8) Light Civilian, (9) Racer, (10) Amphibian, (11) Float/Sea Plane, (12) Flying Boat, and (13) Equipment. Cleveland Primary product Line subjects are denoted by a five-character code, the first characters of which are “CD”.

Patterns

Patterns are provided on either the model airplane plan or on separate pattern sheets.

Primary Line Example Plan

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A Word About Quality

All Cleveland Model & Supply Company plans are high quality. To assist the modeler in subject selection, we have implemented a grading system which applies to Primary Product Line plans. There are four levels of quality, which are:

  • PLATINUM   - The highest quality. A standard reserved for model airplane plans having the highest level of detail, including engine details, cockpit and/or interior detail, scale rib spacing, the highest level of scale fidelity, etc.
  • GOLD   - A standard reserved for model airplane plans having a very high level of detail, including engine detail, cockpit detail, superior scale fidelity, etc.
  • SILVER   - A standard reserved for model airplane plans having a high level of detail, including detailed engine fronts, limited cockpit detail, excellent scale fidelity, etc.
  • BRONZE   - A standard reserved for model airplane plans having good scale fidelity but not having the level of detail exhibited in the platinum, gold, and silver standards.

Why the variation in quality? Today, the quality of scale documentation is taken for granted. Nearly all historically-significant aircraft, particularly military aircraft, are well documented. In addition, many less-historically-significant aircraft are well documented. When some of the earlier subjects were prepared, adequate documentation was not available nor were actual aircraft available to measure and photograph. Such was the case with several World War I and World War II subjects. For some World War II subjects, official government censorship limited the availability of scale documentation and aircraft for measurement and photographic documentation.

Drawing Origins And Scales

Most Cleveland Model & Supply Company subjects were originally prepared in 1/16th scale, or 3/4 inch equals one foot, which was referred to in company literature as “Scale Flying” (abbreviated “SF”). Select, single-engine subjects and some larger, multi-engine subjects, were prepared in 1/24th scale, or 1/2 inch equals one foot, which was referred to in company literature as “Dwarf” (abbreviated “D”). The original scale of the drawing is noted on the title block. Material thicknesses called out on the plans were specific to the scale that the plan was prepared in. From these fundamental scales, the other scales (1/32, 1/24, 1/16, 1/12, 1/6, 1/8, 1/4) that the subjects are offered in are digital reductions or enlargements from the base scale.

Therefore, the material thicknesses specified on the reduced or enlarged-scale drawings are not necessarily relevant for that scale. Also, with a few exceptions, the models were designed as free-flight, rubber-powered models. Therefore, details concerning motor or engine selection, receiver and servo selection and placement, retractable landing gear detail, etc. are not shown. Builders may modify the model for electric or gas power, radio control, retractable landing gear, etc.